Published by admin on 20 Aug 2012

Director for UNM Center of Education Policy Research Takes Critical Look at the University’s Role in the K-12 Pipeline

Peter Winograd

Peter Winograd

Peter Winograd, director of the UNM Center for Education Policy Research was asked by the Regents Committee for Academic/Student Affairs and Research to examine the question of what role the university should play in the statewide Kindergarten through 12th grade pipeline.  In this report to the committee, Winograd explores underlying social problems that can hamper learning and makes recommendations about how UNM might engage in the public discussion.

Winograd Presentation to Board of Regents

Runs:52:01

Winograd presentation PDF

Media contact: Karen Wentworth (505) 277-5627; kwent2@unm.edu

 

Published by admin on 13 Jun 2012

UNM Engineering Student to Work for NASA

George Gorospe

George Gorospe

George Gorospe can hardly contain his enthusiasm when he talks about working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Last spring he completed his Bachelor’s degree in Engineering and is now on his way to the NASA leadership Academy.  He and other students will travel for the next 10 weeks, learning about current missions and meeting with companies that work with NASA.  He then heads to the NASA Ames Research Center in San Jose, California to begin work as a research engineer.  In this audio interview he talks about how he managed to turn a summer learning opportunity into a chance for his dream career.

Listen to his interview

Runs: 4:04

 

Published by admin on 29 May 2012

The Photography of Eduardo Fuss

Clare Daniel

Clare Daniel

Brianne Stein

Brianne Stein

In this dual presentation Center for Southwest Research Fellows Clare Daniel and Brianne Stein present a glimpse into “Worlds within Worlds: The Photography of Eduardo Fuss.”

Listen to their talk

View photography by Eduardo Fuss in this Power point presentation

Daniel is the Digitization Fellow at CSWR and Special Collections.  She is also a doctoral candidate in American Studies with interests in race theory, citizenship and the welfare state.  She is currently working on a dissertation examining contemporary discourses of teenage pregnancy and parenthood in public policy popular culture and national and local advocacy.

Stein is the Pictorial Fellow at CSWR and Special Collections.  She is a first year Ph.D. student in the History Department, focusing on urban environments in modern U.S. history.  Also, she is working on her graduate certificate in the Historic Preservation and Regionalism program.  After completion of the program, she hopes to work in archives.

Media contact: Karen Wentworth (505) 277-5627; kwent2@unm.edu

Published by admin on 16 May 2012

A Scholar Discusses Technology Changes in Research Materials

Brian Luna Lucero

Brian Luna Lucero

Brian Luna Lucero, the Center for Southwest Research Clinton P. Anderson Fellow, explores changes digital resources are making for scholars in his talk, “Special Collections and Digital Humanities Scholarship.”   Lucero has worked in the public service area of University Libraries over the past year teaching students to use resources in the library.

In this talk he speaks about digital humanities and how technology offers scholars new ways to explore age old questions such as how do we make sense of the world? or how do we handle change?

Lucero is a Ph.D. candidate in history studying the U.S. West.  His dissertation focuses on the memory and commemoration of the Spanish colonial past in the American Southwest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Listen to Lucero’s talk

Runs: 27:17

Media contact: Karen Wentworth (505) 277-5627; kwent2@unm.edu

 

Published by admin on 16 May 2012

The Changing Political Attitude of UNM Students during the 20th Century

Natalie Farrell

Natalie Farrell

In this talk Natalie Farrell, the Institutional Fellow in the Center for Southwest Research, reflects on her work throughout the academic year as she digitized historic versions of the student newspaper, the Daily Lobo.  The title of her talk is “The Changing Political Attitude of UNM Students during the 20th Century.”

The complete archives of the Daily Lobo are now available online in the archives of the Lobo Vault.

Farrell is a Ph.D. student in anthropology, working in archaeology.  She has been working in Southwestern archaeology and Geographic Information Systems since graduating with her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Arizona in 2008.  She is specializing in the manufacturing style of Southwestern ceramics.

Listen to Farrell’s talk

Runs: 13:33

Media contact: Karen Wentworth (505) 277-5627; kwent2@unm.edu

 

Published by admin on 16 May 2012

An Overview of Campus Unrest in the 1960’s and 70’s

Aurore Diehl

Aurore Diehl

Aurore Diehl, the Thomas L. Popejoy Fellow in the Center for Southwest Research discusses “The University Occupied: An Overview of Campus Unrest at UNM in the 1960’s and 70’s.”

Diehl is a graduate of UNM’s American Studies program and a second year Master’s student.  Her research focus is the use of popular music as a lends through which to view issues of gender, sexuality, ethnicity and class, with a special focus on gender and sexuality in hard rock and heavy metal music.  She is working on a graduate certificate in Women’s Studies.

Listen to her talk

Runs: 10:46

Media contact: Karen Wentworth (505) 277-5627; kwent2@unm.edu

 

Published by admin on 10 May 2012

Troubled Waters: Undocumented Migration from the Dominican Republic

Frank Graziano, an alumnus of the UNM Latin American Studies program, presents, “Troubled Waters: Undocumented Migration from the Dominican Republic.”

Thousands of Dominicans risk their lives on outboard-powered wooden boats (known as yolas) to cross the Mona Passage and reach the neighboring island of Puerto Rico. As a commonwealth of the United States, Puerto Rico attracts migrants with its dollar economy and its access to the mainland without a passport or visa. For some migrants Puerto Rico is the final destination; for others it is a stopover en route to New York and other US cities.

Graziano, John D. MacArthur Professor of Hispanic Studies at Connecticut University, summarizes the causes of undocumented migration, describes the methods used by smugglers, follows the migrants from pre-departure to arrival and settlement, and details the response of federal border-enforcement and prosecution agencies. Photographs and video clips taken during the fieldwork and acquired from the US Coast Guard and Border Patrol will be presented alongside the research findings. The ethnographic research for this project included about a hundred interviews with migrants, smugglers, and US border-enforcement officials and culminates in a book, Undocumented Dominican Migration, forthcoming (2012) from the University of Texas Press.

Published by admin on 10 May 2012

Wrenching Poetry from the Nancy C. Wood Manuscript Collection

Carolyn McSherry holds the Juan and Virginia Chacon Fellowship and has spent part of the year processing the papers of writer-photographer Nancy Wood.  She is a Ph.D. student in the American Studies program.  Her research is about the challenges posed to 1930s-era agricultural improvement projects in Puerto Rico and on Navajo lands by people who lived in and knew those landscapes, and by others.  She is interested in the relationships between agricultural sciences and colonialism.

In this talk, titled “Wrenching Poetry from the Nancy C. Wood Manuscript Collection” she explores the manuscripts in the Nancy C. Wood manuscript collection and talks about Wood as a writer.  At the beginning of the talk she discusses this poem by Nancy C. Wood.

Hold on to what is good,

even when it is

a handful of earth.

Hold on to what you believe

even when it is

a tree which stands by itself.

Hold on to what you must do

even if it is

a long way from here.

Hold on to life even when

it is easier letting go.

Hold on to my hand

even when I have gone away from you.

Listen to the talk

Runs: 15:47

Published by admin on 10 May 2012

CWSR Fellow Speaks on Controversy and Conflict in Apollo’s Quest for Lunar Knowledge

 

Hanna Thompson

Hanna Thompson

Hanna Thompson, Center for Southwest Research Fellow speaks on “A Scientific Endeavor: Controversy and Conflict in Apollo’s Quest for Lunar Knowledge.” Thompson is a student in the Landscape Architecture Program. For this fellowship she investigated former NASA Astronaut Harrison Schmitt’s role as the first and only scientist in the Apollo Program.

Hear her talk

runs:18:48

 

 

Published by admin on 20 Apr 2012

PBS’s Ray Suarez on Teacher Town Hall

Ray Suarez

PBS Sr. Correspondent Ray Suarez talks with UNM Live about the Teacher Town Hall he moderated in Albuquerque as part of PBS’s “American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen” initiative. New Mexico’s KNME was one of only 20 PBS stations selected to participate in the initiative.

Published by admin on 16 Feb 2012

UNM Hosts Second Lecture Tied to Academic Planning Efforts

James EllisJames Ellis presents the second lecture in a series tied closely to the University Council on Academic Priorities (UCAP).   The talk titled, “Cre­at­ing the Next Gen­er­a­tion of Lead­ers” fea­tures Ellis, Dean of the Mar­shall School of Busi­ness from the Uni­ver­sity of South­ern Cal­i­for­nia.

“I am pleased that James Ellis, a UNM grad­u­ate, estab­lished busi­ness pro­fes­sional and dean of one of the top busi­ness schools, has agreed to come to UNM and share his unique per­spec­tive about the future of higher edu­ca­tion,” said UNM Provost Chaouki Abdallah.

The Uni­ver­sity Coun­cil on Aca­d­e­mic Pri­or­i­ties (UCAP) is a group of fac­ulty, admin­is­tra­tors and stu­dents work­ing with Provost Abdal­lah to iden­tify the prin­ci­ple fea­tures of the con­text of higher edu­ca­tion in the coun­try and for UNM to come up with pos­si­ble sets of alter­na­tive aca­d­e­mic direc­tions. The effort is con­ceived as a pre­lude to more for­mal aca­d­e­mic plan­ning that will set goals and make defin­i­tive plans.

View the Ellis Lecture

Runs: 1:26:00

Published by admin on 24 Jan 2012

Mellon Foundation President Speaks at UNM

Mellon Foundation President Don Randel

Mellon Foundation President Don Randel

Don Randel, Ph.D. and president of the Mellon Foundations talks about the current state of education in the United States and outlines some problems in current education policy. In this talk sponsored by the UNM Office of the Provost he also gives some free advice about SAT scores, tuition decisions, research and ways to fund education.

Randel talk

Runs: 53:00

Randel Question and Answer session with UNM faculty

Runs:  42:00

Published by admin on 09 Jan 2012

Engineering Professor and Graduate Student Work Out Fast, Clean Way to Render Images

PProf. Pradeep Sen with student

Prof. Pradeep Sen with student

UNM Computer and Engineering Assistant Professor Pradeep Sen and his graduate student Soheil Darabi have found a unique way to solve an old problem in the film industry.  It can take hundreds of hours of computer time to remove noise from digital images and build a graphically acceptable product.  But Sen and  Darabi have found a way to filer the noise much more quickly.  In this conversation with Karen Wentworth, Sen describes his work.

Pradeep Sen discusses Monte Carlo Filtering

Runs:  13:14

Published by admin on 09 Dec 2011

A Glimpse of Death in Spain during the Magdalenian Age

UNM Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Lawrence Straus

UNM Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Lawrence Straus

The gaps in what anthropologists know about the Magdalenian Age in Europe are enormous.  Few human bones have been found, and the information about them is limited.  That’s why the discovery of a partially complete human burial at El Mirón Cave is so exciting.  It is the first burial ever found from this time period.  UNM Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Lawrence Strauss discusses his latest find in Spain.

Hear his conversation with Karen Wentworth here.

Runs:32:32

Published by admin on 19 Sep 2011

Cooperation Among Wild Chimpanzees

John Mitani, Prof. of Anthropology University of MichiganUniversity of Michigan Professor of Anthropology John Mitani talks about “Cooperation among Wild Chimpanzees” during a Sept. 19, 2011 colloquium at the University of New Mexico.  He is introduced by Assist. Professor of Anthropology at UNM, Martin Muller.

Mitani does extensive field research and is currently working at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda with a large group of chimpanzees.  He is interested in cooperation among male chimpanzees and shares his observations in this talk.

Cooperation among Wild Chimpanzees

Runs: 53.22

Published by admin on 08 Jul 2011

Water Rights and Wrongs in the Middle Rio Grande

Sam Markwell, 2011 Office of the State Historian ScholarUNM graduate student Sam Markwell explores the political, economic and cultural conditions in which the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) was established.  Markwell focuses on how it has affected pueblo and acequia communities and their claims to water rights within the larger context of change shaping the twentieth century.

This lecture explores how the “Conservancy Project” became and remained the MGCSD through the long and ongoing processes of negotiation, contestation and incorporation among rural and urban communities, financial institutions, municipalities and state and federal government agencies.

Markwell is a graduate of the UNM School of Anthropology and is expanding on work he did during his time as an undergraduate.  Currently his studies focus on the cultural politics of water in the South Valley area of Albuquerque with a special interest in environmental justice.

The lecture was cosponsored by the Office of the State Historian Scholars Program, the Historical Society of New Mexico and the Center for Southwest Research.

Published by admin on 01 Jul 2011

Prickly Pears, Serapes, Pueblos and Tortillas: Women in the New Mexico Territory, 1846-1866

Katherine Massoth, 2011 Office of the State Historian ScholarIn this lecture 2011 History Scholar Katherine Massoth discusses ways white Americans reacted to the environment, clothing, and foodstuffs of New Mexican people between 1846 and 1866.  Cuisine and couture became areas where daily practices were absorbed and traded between the colonizers and the colonized and the colonizers learned from the Mexican and Native Americans, slowly changing their own ideas of appropriate standards for food and clothing.

Massoth is a Presidential Fellow and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Iowa where she received her M.A. degree in United States History in 2008. She specializes in the history of gender and race in the American West. The lecture was cosponsored by the Office of the State Historian and the Center for Southwest Research at UNM.

Runs: 43:58

 

 

Published by admin on 16 May 2011

Fashioning Advocacy” La Donna Harris and the Codification of Values in the Case of Taos Blue Lake

Ashley Sherry, 2011 Office of the State Historian Fellow

Ashley Sherry, 2011 Office of the State Historian Fellow

Ashley Sherry was the LaDonna Harris fellow (2009-2010) and a Center for Regional Studies fellow in the Center for Southwest Research (2011).  She is also a scholar with the Office of the State Historian.  Sherry’s research and the focus of this talk is the discourse and model of Indigenous advocacy put forth by LaDonna Harris as it pertains to the return of Blue Lake to Taos Pueblo.  LaDonna Harris’ papers and the records of Americans for Indian Opportunity are housed at the Center for Southwest Research in Zimmerman Library.  Sherry is introduced by Beth Silbergleit from CSWR and Dennis Trujillo from the Office of the State Historian.  Harris attended the talk and reflects on Sherry’s examination of her life’s work.

Runs: 38:31

Published by admin on 13 May 2011

Carousel of Color: Comparing Set Designs of Two Productions of “Liliom”

Aurore Diehl, Center for Regional Studies Fellow

Aurore Diehl, Center for Regional Studies Fellow

Aurore Diehl, the Thomas L. Popejoy Center for Regional Studies Fellow in the Center for Southwest Research in Zimmerman Libraries discusses her research in university archives as she compares two productions done by the Department of Drama at UNM.  Diehl is a first year master’s degree student in American Studies.  She is interested in the study of gender and sexuality in popular music.

Runs: 8:45

Published by admin on 13 May 2011

J.B. Jackson: Father of Cultural Landscape Studies

Jessica Gardener, Center for Regional Studies Fellow

Jessica Gardener, Center for Regional Studies Fellow

Jessica Gardener, the Center for Regional Studies Beatrice Chauvenet Fellow at the Center for Southwest Research in Zimmerman Library talks about the collection of J.B. Jackson, the Father of Cultural Landscape Studies.  Gardener, a Master’s student in Landscape Architecture at UNM curated the collection during her fellowship.  Her own research is in the area of upland, dry land restoration and water in the urban environment.

Runs: 9:42

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